ABAI 2018 – Presentations by Oregonians

Program by Day for Friday, May 25, 2018

 

Business Meetings

Business Meeting #7
Oregon Association for Behavior Analysis (ORABA) Business Meeting
Friday, May 25, 2018
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom C
Chair: Melissa J. Gard (Building Bridges / ORABA)
The Oregon Association for Behavior Analysis (ORABA) is an affiliated chapter of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), an affiliate of the Association for Professional Behavior Analysts (APBA), and an approved CEU provider by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). ORABA encourages the understanding of all aspects of behavior analysis and serve as a professional resource group for those who embrace and practice behavior analytic interventions. We support the design and implementation of evidence based practice to improve the lives of Oregonians. During this business meeting we hope to collaborate with members and interested parties to improve how our chapter meets the diverse needs of our members.
Keyword(s): affiliated chapter, business meeting

 

Program by Day for Saturday, May 26, 2018

 

Symposia

Symposium #15
CE Offered: BACB
Repetitive Behavior in ASD: Current Trends in Research and Practice
Saturday, May 26, 2018
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall C
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Amarie Carnett, Ph.D.
Chair: Tracy Jane Raulston (Penn State)
Discussant: Amarie Carnett (University of North Texas)
Abstract: Rigid and repetitive patterns and/or interests (RRBIs) are a core feature of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). In comparison to social-communication interventions for children with ASD, surprising little is known about the effectiveness, implementation, and current practices being delivered RRBIs. Several analytic practices show a strong evidence-base or promise in reducing RRBIs or other co-occurring maladaptive behaviors (National Autism Center, 2015). There are several areas of imperative inquiry. In this symposium, two studies will be presented. The first study will present data from an online survey of practices implemented by Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) for children (birth to age 8) across a variety of sub-topographies of repetitive behavior (e.g., stereotypy, insistence on sameness). The second study will present findings for a meta-analysis on interventions for vocal stereotypy with a focus on the implications of measurement differences. Discussed will be gaps in extant literature and implications of findings for science and practice.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): repetitive behavior, rigid behavior, stereotypy, vocal stereotypy
Target Audience: The target audience for this presentation are researchers and practitioners who work with individuals with autism who engage in rigid and/or repetitive patterns of behavior and/or interests.
Early Interventions for Repetitive Behavior in Autism: An Online Survey of Practices by Behavior Analysts
SARAH GRACE HANSEN (Georgia State University), Tracy Jane Raulston (Penn State), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon), Laura Lee McIntyre (University of Oregon)
Abstract: The evidence base of interventions to treat rigid and repetitive patterns of behavior and/or interests (RRBIs) in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is growing. Some researchers have asserted that some repetitive behavior can actually be adaptive for infants and young children and are present in typical development. However, as RRBIs are a core feature of ASD, the reduction of these behavioral topographies is often targeted in clinical practice. Yet, surprisingly little is known about what practices are actually being implemented in the field. An online survey was distributed to Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBAs) who indicated that they worked with young children with ASD. A total of 128 BCBAs submitted complete entires. Survey items included BCBAs frequency of use of 15 practices including: antecedent-based embedded perseverative interests, consequence-based embedded perseverative interests, differential reinforcement of incompatible behavior (DRI), differential reinforcement of other or zero rates of behavior (DRO), differential reinforcement of variable behavior (DRV), environmental enrichment, functional communication training (FCT), noncontingent or time based schedules of reinforcement, overcorrection, physical exercise, response blocking, response cost, response interruption redirection (RIRD), sensory extinction, skill enrichment, visual and/or cues and 1 assessment (functional analysis). Additionally, we collected data on age ranges (i.e., birth to three year olds, three to five year olds, and five to eight year olds) with which BCBAs implemented or supervised implementation of each intervention and their perceptions of the effectiveness of each intervention. Finally, we collected a variety of demographic data. Preliminary analyses revealed that the most common practices implemented were: environmental enrichment, skill enrichment, visual and/or verbal cues, FCT, and RIRD. The interventions implemented the least were response cost, overcorrection, sensory extinction, and DRV. The interventions BCBAs rated the most effective were FCT, DRI, RIRD, and consequence-based embedded perseverative interests. The interventions that were rated the least effective were DRV, response cost, overcorrection, and physical exercise. Correlates to usage and perceptions of effectiveness including educational background, training, practice setting, and clientele will be discussed, as well as implications for future research and practice.
A Meta-Analysis of Automatically-Maintained Vocal Stereotypy in Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder
THEONI MANTZOROS (Pennsylvania State University), Ashley McCoy (Pennsylvania State University), David L. Lee (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract: Vocal stereotypy (VS) is a behavior of concern for many individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Engagement in VS can be detrimental in that it may be stigmatizing in social settings and interfere with performance on academic and vocational tasks. A first step in treating VS is to determine function through a functional analysis or functional behavior assessment. Interventions can then be developed based on the specific function of the VS. Twenty-seven studies were identified incorporating 78 participants diagnosed with ASD who engaged in automatically-maintained VS. In this presentation the effects of the available treatments for automatically-reinforced VS will be discussed. Interventions include matched stimulation, differential reinforcement, response interruption and redirection (RIRD), and other punishment procedures. Preliminary analyses indicate that there are multiple interventions in the literature which are effective in decreasing automatically-reinforced VS, with Tau-U values suggesting treatment effects in the medium to large range. Results of RIRD were further assessed based on the data collection methodology utilized in individual studies which included whole session and interrupted session data collection. A limitation of the extant literature is the degree to which the groups vary within each intervention, as well as the limited number of participants per treatment. Implications for practice and future research will be discussed.

 

Symposium #17
CE Offered: BACB
Assessment and Treatment of Elopement for Individuals With Disabilities
Saturday, May 26, 2018
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom H
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Christina Fragale, Ph.D.
Chair: Tasia Brafford (University of Oregon)
Discussant: Christina Fragale (The University of Texas; The Meadows Center for the Prevention of Educational Risk)
Abstract: Elopement is a common topography of challenging behavior among individuals with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities. Elopement can lead to exposure to dangerous situations, disrupt learning, limit access to residential services and community activities, and even lead to serious injury or death. A systematic literature search identified 18 studies published from 2009 to 2016 that evaluated interventions to decrease elopement. The studies were summarized in terms of (a) participant characteristics, (b) assessment procedures, (c) intervention procedures, (d) intervention results. Frequent interventions included functional communication training, differential reinforcement, and response blocking. Functional analyses were conducted for each participant with several methodological modifications to address difficulties associated with functional analysis of elopement. Functional analysis of elopement may be challenging as participant retrieval may be necessary for safety purposes, but could serve as a confounding variable providing attention across all conditions. Systematic replication of functional analysis procedures utilized by Lehardy et al. (2013) was implemented with a 5-year-old male diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Results indicated elopement was maintained by access to tangibles. Functional communication training resulted in markedly reduced instances of elopement, confirming the results of the functional analysis. Implications and recommendations for practice will be discussed and suggestions for future research will be offered.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): elopement, FCT, functional analysis
Target Audience: Behavior analysts including clinicians, teachers, researchers, BCBAs, and BCaBAs.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) state common interventions in research for elopement and the strengths and weaknesses of these approaches; (2) recognize functional analysis procedures that can be used to identify the function of elopement behavior; (3) identify areas in need of further research on the assessment and intervention of elopement.
Systematic Review of Assessment and Treatment of Elopement in Individuals With Autism and Developmental Disabilities
Buket Erturk (University of Oregon), NICOLE O’GUINN (Baylor University), Tonya Nichole Davis (Baylor University), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon)
Abstract: Elopement is commonly occurring topography of challenging behavior among individuals with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities. Elopement can disrupt learning, limit access to residential services, limit access to community activities, and in extreme cases lead to serious injury or death. A systematic literature search identified 18 studies published from 2009 to 2016 that evaluated interventions to decrease elopement. The studies were summarized in terms of (a) participant characteristics, (b) assessment procedures, (c) intervention procedures, (d) intervention results. Across the 18 studies, intervention was implemented across 27 participants with autism spectrum disorders and other developmental disabilities, ages four to 47 years. Functional analyses were conducted for each participant with several methodological modifications to address difficulties associated with functional analysis of elopement. The most frequent interventions included functional communication training, differential reinforcement, and response blocking. Implications for practice will be discussed and suggestions for future research will be offered.
Evaluation and Treatment of Elopement Among Children With Developmental Disabilities
Nicole O’Guinn (Baylor University), Tonya Nichole Davis (Baylor University), VIDA CANESTARO (Baylor University )
Abstract: Elopement is a frequent problem among individuals diagnosed with developmental disabilities. Elopement can lead to an individual being exposed to dangerous situations. Moreover, elopement can increase stress for caretakers. Functional analysis of elopement may be challenging due to the fact that participant retrieval may be necessary for safety purposes, but could serve as a confounding variable providing attention across all conditions. A review of the literature revealed a variety of functional analysis methodologies to address these difficulties associated with functional analysis of elopement. The current study is a systematic replication of functional analysis procedures utilized by Lehardy et al. (2013). This functional analysis methodology was implemented with a 5-year-old male diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Results indicated elopement was maintained by access to tangibles. Functional communication training resulted in markedly reduced instances of elopement, thus confirming the results of the functional analysis. The results of this study, recommendations for practice, and suggestions for future research will be discussed.

 

 Symposium #54
CE Offered: BACB
School-Based Interventions With At-Risk Students: Addressing Academic Engagement, Student Interactions, and Disruptive Classroom Behavior
Saturday, May 26, 2018
11:00 AM–12:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom HI
Area: EDC/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: P. Raymond Joslyn, Ph.D.
Chair: P. Raymond Joslyn (Berry College)
Discussant: Anthony Biglan (Oregon Research Institute)
Abstract: Behavior analytic approaches in school settings are supported by a large foundation of empirical research. However, approaches for working with at-risk students have historically been underrepresented in the behavioral literature. The current symposium addresses ways to increase academic engagement, improve peer interactions, and decrease disruptive behavior in school settings with at-risk students. Study 1 compared the effects of differential negative reinforcement of alternative behavior (DNRA) and curricular revision (CR) on problem behavior with students diagnosed with oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Study 2 evaluated the effects of positive and negative reinforcement interventions on escape-maintained problem behavior with secondary students diagnosed with emotional and behavioral disorders (EBD). Study 3 examined the effects of the Good Behavior Game, a well-documented group contingency procedure, on student interactions in primary and secondary classrooms for students with EBD. Study 4 examined the effectiveness of teacher-implemented GBG on disruptive classroom behavior with students in a residential facility for juvenile offenders. Implications, future directions, and special considerations for working with this population will be discussed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): academic intervention, at-risk students, classroom management, escape-maintained behavior
Target Audience: Researchers and practitioners who work in school settings with at-risk students or other special education populations, or those who want to learn more about the implementation of behavioral classroom management would benefit from attending this symposium.
Learning Objectives: Individuals attending this symposium will be able to: 1) Differentiate between differential reinforcement of alternative behavior (DNRA) and curricular revision (CR), and describe the effects of these procedures on escape-maintained problem behavior with at-risk students. 2) Describe the procedures and potential effects of positive and negative reinforcement interventions for at-risk students who engage in escape-maintained problem behavior. 3) Describe the procedural variations and potential effects of the Good Behavior Game with at-risk students.
To Treat or to Teach: Comparing Strategies to Reduce Escape-Maintained Behavior
LUCIE ROMANO (West Virginia University), Claire C. St. Peter (West Virginia University), Gabrielle Mesches (West Virginia University), Apral Foreman (West Virginia University)
Abstract: Differential negative reinforcement of alternative behavior (DNRA) reduces escape-maintained challenging behavior, but can result in lost instructional time. Instructional time could be maintained through interventions like curricular revision (CR), but the efficacy of CR is less established. We compared DNRA and CR for 3 children with age-typical intellectual functioning whose challenging behavior was maintained by escape from academic tasks. During DNRA, we taught the child to appropriately request a different, mastered task. During CR, we broke the original task into simpler components until the child mastered each component, but still permitted escape following challenging behavior. Curricular revision resulted in less challenging behavior than DNRA for one participant. For the other two participants, DNRA was initially more effective than CR, but participants rarely engaged with the academic task. Challenging behavior was equally suppressed across conditions once extinction for challenging behavior was added to CR. Curricular revision also resulted in each child spending substantially more time engaged with the new task than the mastered task. Curricular revision did not increase the likelihood of treatment relapse relative to DNRA for any participant. Thus, CR may be a desirable option for treating escape-maintained behavior.
A Comparison of Positive and Negative Reinforcement With Secondary School Mathematics Avoiders With Emotional and Behavioural Disorders
JENNIFER L. AUSTIN (University of South Wales), Katie Scoble (University of South Wales ), Lynette Davies (University of South Wales), Ioannis Angelakis (University of South Wales)
Abstract: Previous research has demonstrated that positive reinforcement can effectively treat problem behaviour maintained by escape from demands. We evaluated the effects negative and positive reinforcement interventions on engagement with math tasks for three secondary students with a history of math avoidance. A trial-based functional analysis confirmed that all three participants’ problem behaviours were maintained by escape. We used an alternating treatments design to compare the relative effects of negative (i.e., removal of math tasks) and positive (edibles) reinforcement on work completion and accuracy. We then conducted a choice phase, in which participants could opt to work for removal of math problems or edibles. Results showed that positive reinforcement increased rates of problem completion and accuracy for two of the three participants. When allowed to choose, all participants opted for the positive reinforcement contingency and reported that they enjoyed completing math problems with the positive reinforcement contingency and disliked the worksheets when the escape contingency was applied. These results bolster previous findings indicating that positive reinforcement interventions may be more efficacious than negative reinforcement strategies for treating escape-maintained behaviour. Our results also raise important questions regarding how intervention approach may alter how an individual feels about engaging in appropriate behaviour.
Does the Good Behavior Game Evoke Negative Peer Pressure? Analyses in Primary and Secondary School Classrooms
EMILY GROVES (University of South Wales), Jennifer L. Austin (University of South Wales)
Abstract: The Good Behaviour Game (GBG) is a classroom management system that employs an interdependent group contingency, whereby students must work as a team to win the game. This arrangement means that a single child’s behaviour may make the difference between a team winning or losing. Teachers may have concerns about the GBG’s fairness and its potential to evoke negative peer interactions (especially toward those children who are most likely to break rules). Research has shown that positive interactions can be targeted and increased during the GBG, but much less is known about peer interactions when the game does not specifically arrange contingencies to promote prosocial behaviour. We evaluated children’s social interactions during a GBG that targeted behaviours unrelated to peer social interactions. Using a withdrawal design, we evaluated outcomes in a secondary classroom for students with emotional and behavioural disorders, as well as in a primary classroom for children with mild developmental disabilities. Results indicated that the GBG produced positive changes in target behaviours. More importantly, however, they showed that playing the game decreased negative peer interactions and increased positive interactions. Further, social validity results indicated that the majority of children thought the interdependent group contingency was fair.
Training Teachers to Implement the Good Behavior Game With Juvenile Offenders
P. RAYMOND JOSLYN (Berry College), Faris Rashad Kronfli (University of Florida), Timothy R. Vollmer (University of Florida)
Abstract: The Good Behavior Game (GBG) is a group contingency procedure that is effective in reducing disruptive behavior and increasing on-task behavior in a variety of settings. This procedure has the support of a large literature base, but has not been evaluated with juvenile offenders who engage in severe problem behavior. Further, there are few GBG studies that directly address methods for training teachers to implement the procedure. In the current study, a group training procedure was used to quickly train 4 teachers to implement the GBG in classrooms in a secure residential facility for juvenile offenders. Results indicated that the teachers were able to produce substantial reductions in disruptive classroom behavior following a brief training. Teacher delivery of praise also increased substantially as a result of the intervention. Social validity data indicated that both teachers and students found the game to be effective. Implications, directions for future research, and special considerations for working with this population are discussed.

 

Poster Session

Poster Session #73
Saturday, May 26, 2018
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Grand Ballroom 1-6
Chair: Terri M. Bright (MSPCA Angell)

 

66. Overweight and Obesity Behavioral Economics: Delay and Effort Discounting Processes
Area: PCH/DEV; Domain: Theory
GISEL G. ESCOBAR (National Autonomous University of Mexico), Silvia Morales Chaine (National Autonomous University of Mexico), Suzanne H. Mitchell (Oregon Health & Science University)
Discussant: Karola Dillenburger (Queen’s University Belfast)
Abstract: Overweight and obesity are a growing public health problem in Mexico; therefore the knowledge about its causes is a need. The World Health Organization points out both the bad eating habits and the sedentary lifestyle as risk factors to develop those problems, and both can be seen as choices in which the individuals allocate their responding among available alternatives. From the behavioral economics view, has been shown that delay discounting is a trans-disease process in a variety of behavioral disorders, such as drug addiction, pathological gambling, obesity and so on. Particularly with overweight and obesity, it seems that not only the decrease in the value of a reinforcer as a function of the delay to its receipt is involved, but also the number of behaviors implicated thru the time (effort) has an impact in the loss of the value of a reinforcer as a function of the increasing effort to get it. Nevertheless, there is limited information regarding the role of effort in the discounting field and its relationship with health problems. It is considering that identify different response patterns of choice base on delays and efforts, can help to guide efficient treatments to prevent and reduce overweight and obesity.

 

95. Text Message Performance Feedback for Preservice Teachers in Early Intervention and Early Childhood Special Education
Area: DDA/VRB; Domain: Applied Research
SARAH GRACE HANSEN (Georgia State University), Sloan Storie (University of Oregon), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon), Tracy McKinney (Georgia State University)
Discussant: Kayla Jenssen (Western Michigan University)
Abstract: Early childhood special education (ECSE) provides critical services and support for young children. Research indicates that quality experiences early on can improve outcomes over time (Bierman, Heinrichs, Welsh, 2014). Quality EI/ECSE services allow for children with special needs to learn from peers, receive intervention from natural change agents, and develop across domains. Despite the documented importance of effective intervention and quality services in early childhood, ECSE teachers and early interventionists are at a shortage. ECSE teacher shortages are endemic across the age range, but potentially most vital in early childhood settings (Chisholm, 2015). Evidence bases are developing the most effective ways to train teachers to be effective service providers. As this research base develops, new and innovative teacher training methodologies have been created to more effectively and efficiently address this need. The current study examined the efficacy of text-based performance feedback on increased use of teacher strategies to address social communication skills in young children with or at risk for disabilities. Specifically, student teachers received feedback via text message on brief videos of their use of naturalistic teaching strategies to increase manding and play in young children with developmental disabilities. Initial results of a non-concurrent multiple probe across participants design are reported, opportunities for future research are discussed.

 

Invited Panel

Invited Panel #140
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Behavioral Economics and Public Policy: A Panel With Discussion
Saturday, May 26, 2018
5:00 PM–5:50 PM
Marriott Marquis, San Diego Ballroom B
Area: SCI
CE Instructor: Matthew W. Johnson, Ph.D.
Chair: Matthew W. Johnson (Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine)
MIKHAIL KOFFARNUS (Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute)
SUZANNE H. MITCHELL (Oregon Health & Science University)
BETHANY R. RAIFF (Rowan University)
Mikhail Koffarnus received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He is currently a Research Assistant Professor at the Virginia Tech Carilion Research Institute. Dr. Koffarnus’ research focuses on understanding drug abuse and developing drug abuse treatments from a behavioral economic perspective. Decision-making processes are often disrupted in drug users, leading to a systematic preference for immediately available rewards like drugs over delayed rewards like improved health or gainful employment. His active areas of research aim to understand and counteract this pattern, and include the use of technology to facilitate contingency management interventions, the neural correlates of risky and impulsive decision making, and the abuse liability of cigarettes and other nicotine products. Additionally, he has served on the editorial boards of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and Experimental and Clinical Psychopharmacology.
Suzanne H. Mitchell, Ph.D., is a Professor at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU) in the Department of Behavioral Neuroscience, with secondary appointments in Psychiatry and in the Oregon Institute for Occupational health Science. She obtained her B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees at the University of Hull, England and her Ph.D. at SUNY-Stony Brook, USA. Her dissertation focused on the economics of foraging behavior of rats, examining the role of the energetic costs and benefits in feeding. Her committee was chaired by Howard Rachlin, whose influence made her sensitive to the role of temporal costs as well as energetic costs in determining the value of food rewards. During a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Chicago, Dr. Mitchell worked with Harriet de Wit, Ph.D. using behavioral economics as an explanation for use of alcohol, nicotine/cigarettes, and amphetamine in humans. During that time she also began collaborating with Jerry Richards, Ph.D. on delay discounting studies with rats. Following her postdoctoral work, Dr. Mitchell was an assistant professor at the University of New Hampshire, where she continued to explore recreational drug use using behavioral economic models. She moved her lab to OHSU in 2001 from the University of New Hampshire to devote more time to research, particularly looking into why drug users tend to be more impulsive than non-drug users using human and animal models. Most recently she has returned to her earlier interests in energetic costs and her research has increased its scope to include effort-related decision-making in clinical populations. She has received funding from various NIH institutes (NHLBI, NIAAA, NIDA and NIH), has served on several study sections as a member and as an ad hoc participant, and has received awards for education and mentoring.
Dr. Raiff graduated from the University of Florida in 2008 with her PhD in Psychology, with an emphasis in Behavioral Pharmacology. She worked as a principal investigator for four years at the National Development and Research Institutes, Inc. before moving to the Department of Psychology at Rowan University, where she is now an Associate Professor. Dr. Raiff’s primary research interests include developing and evaluating the integration of technological innovations with behavioral economic interventions for promoting healthy behavior. Dr. Raiff is currently developing two video games which use a contingency management intervention with nonmonetary incentives to encourage people to quit smoking. In addition to her work on smoking cessation, Dr. Raiff has also evaluated technology-delivered behavioral interventions for improving diabetes management and physical activity. Dr. Raiff was the 2015 recipient of the B. F. Skinner New Researcher Award for Applied Research, from Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. She holds a vested interest in developing cost-effective, scalable, and sustainable treatments, using the principles of behavioral economics, to address many of society’s unhealthy behaviors.
Abstract: This session is coupled with, and immediately follows, a SQAB tutorial on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy presented by Dr. Steven Hursh. Panelists will be asked to speak briefly about their research program and to bring questions designed to foster discussion with audience members. The goal is to generate ideas and collaborative efforts among basic, translational, and applied scientists. The tutorial and panel discussion has arisen because the Society for the Quantitative Analysis of Behavior (SQAB), an organization that emphasizes fundamental sciences related to behavior analysis, meets immediately before ABAI. The tandem meetings of these two organizations present opportunities for attendees to hear about core sciences related to behavior analysis. The SQAB tutorials have provided an excellent spur for such discussions but we (SQAB and ABAI’s Science Board) wish to take this a step further. This panel discussion, which represents a partnership between SQAB and ABAI, will create a setting in which basic and applied scientists, as well as practitioners, can meet to discuss applications of the topics raised in a SQAB tutorial.
Instruction Level: Basic
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of the presentation, participants will be able to: (1) describe behavioral economic principles; (2) link basic behavioral economic ideas to practical solutions; (3) provide examples of behavioral economic solutions to policy-level concerns.

 

Business Meeting

Business Meeting #170
Neuroscience Special Interest Group
Saturday, May 26, 2018
7:00 PM–7:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom C
Chair: Suzanne H. Mitchell (Oregon Health & Science University)
Meeting to discuss outreach to increase membership from within ABAI, ideas for possible future symposia, and expanding website resources.
Keyword(s): brain imaging, brain injury, neuroanatomy, neuroscience

 

Poster Sessions

Expo Poster Session #172
Saturday, May 26, 2018
8:00 PM–10:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Pacific Ballroom

 

27. Applied Behavior Analysis at Oregon Institute of Technology
MARIA LYNN KESSLER (Oregon Institute of Technology), Dawn Allison Bailey (Oregon Institute of Technology), John Borgen (Oregon Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Oregon Institute of Technology offers graduate and undergraduate training in Applied Behavior Analysis. The focus of the applied behavior analysis programs is on the development of competence in and the application of the concepts, principles, and methods of behavior analysis. The mission of the MS-ABA program is to enable students to become effective and ethical behavior analysts. Students will be prepared to apply principles of behavior analysis to enhance the lives of individuals across a wide variety of settings. The program emphasizes a foundation in theory, concepts, and principles, development of basic behavior analytic skills, and an emphasis on professional and ethical responsibilities. The MS-ABA includes a Behavior Analyst Certification Board BCBA© verified course sequence, practicum, and research opportunities. Oregon Tech also offers a Graduate Certificate in Applied Behavior Analysis and a BCaBA© Verified Course Sequence. All courses are available to students at our Klamath Falls and Portland-Metro campuses and at any location via online videoconferencing.

 

87. Neuroscience SIG: The wizard behind the behavioral curtain
SUZANNE H. MITCHELL (Oregon Health & Science University)
Abstract: We will highlight the main objective and the four missions of our SIG. That is, to bring together researchers, academics, clinicians, and students interested in the intersections of behavior analysis and neuroscience and to: (1) introduce behavior analytic research to the neurosciences and vice versa; (2) provide a meeting place and training environment for students and professionals alike interested in basic and applied neuroscience research; (3) provide a forum for collaborative relationships and the sharing best practices; and (4) advocate for and promote high standards in the application of behavior analytic treatments for individuals with neurological dysfunction. Those interested in contributing to our efforts in increasing the relevance and visibility of this SIG or with ideas for initiatives to do this are encouraged to visit the expo and speak to us.

 

129. Oregon Association for Behavior Analysis (ORABA)
MELISSA J. GARD (Building Bridges / ORABA), Emily Kearney (ORABA), Alice A. Keyl Austin (AKA Consulting-Anchor Academy, Oregon Association for Behavior Analysis, Oregon Institute of Technology), Maria Lynn Kessler (Oregon Institute of Technology), Jenny Fisher (Oregon Association for Behavior Analysis), Analise A Herrera-Minteer (Play Connections Autism Center)
Abstract: The Oregon Association for Behavior Analysis (ORABA) is an affiliated chapter of the Association for Behavior Analysis International (ABAI), an affiliate of the Association for Professional Behavior Analysts (APBA), and an approved CEU provider by the Behavior Analyst Certification Board (BACB). ORABA encourages the understanding of all aspects of behavior analysis and serve as a professional resource group for those who embrace and practice behavior analytic interventions. We support the design and implementation of evidence based practice to improve the lives of Oregonians.

Program by Day for Sunday, May 27, 2018

 Symposium

Symposium #195
CE Offered: BACB
Training Paraprofessionals to Implement Evidence-Based Interventions
Sunday, May 27, 2018
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall A
Area: DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Jeffrey Michael Chan, Ph.D.
Chair: Rachel Scalzo (University of South Florida)
Discussant: Jeffrey Michael Chan (Northern Illinois University)
Abstract: Effective training of paraprofessionals is critical in creating behavior change for children with developmental disabilities, yet many paraprofessionals receive limited professional development or support in implementing behavior plans. Therefore, it is necessary to examine the training procedures for paraprofessionals to identify the most efficient, cost-effective approaches to increase a paraprofessional’s ability to implement a behavior plan with fidelity. The research included in this symposium addresses a variety of approaches to training, including behavioral skills training and practice-based coaching to increase paraprofessionals’ skills in implementing behavior change procedures. These studies note the marked increases in treatment fidelity after training as well as reductions in challenging behavior and increases in adaptive skills in the children the paraprofessionals work with in home, school, and community settings. In sum, these studies outline several evidence-based approaches to training paraprofessionals in executing behavior plans with fidelity. Limitations and future areas of research will also be addressed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): paraprofessionals, treatment fidelity
Target Audience: Behavior analysts working with paraprofessionals
Impact of a Teacher-as-Coach Model: Improving Paraprofessionals Fidelity of Implementation of Discrete Trial Training for Students With Moderate-to-Severe Developmental Disabilities
RAIA ROSENBLOOM (University of Kansas), Rose A. Mason (Purdue University), Alana Schnitz (University of Kansas)
Abstract: Ensuring educational progress for students with moderate-to-severe developmental disabilities requires exposure to well executed evidence-based practices. This necessitates that the special education workforce, including paraprofessionals, be well-trained. Yet evidence regarding effective training mechanisms for paraprofessionals is limited. A multiple baseline design across five teachers was used to evaluate the impact of online instructional modules and a Practice-Based Coaching (PBC) model with teacher-as-coach on their paraprofessionals’ fidelity of discrete trial training (DTT). Implementation of the instructional modules yielded little to no change in paraprofessionals’ DTT fidelity, however, a clear functional relation between PBC and improvement in paraprofessionals’ fidelity of implementation of DTT was demonstrated.
Learning Language Through Play: Coaching Paraeducators in the Preschool Classroom
REBECCA FRANTZ (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign), Buket Erturk (University of Oregon), Sarah Grace Hansen (Georgia State University), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon), Tracy Jane Raulston (Pennsylvania State University)
Abstract: Extensive research suggests naturalistic approaches, including Enhanced Milieu Teaching (EMT), improve the acquisition, generalization, and maintenance of communication skills among children with developmental disabilities (DD). Limited research has examined professional development for paraeducators, particularly related to communication interventions. The current study uses a randomized, single-case multiple baseline design across participants to address the impact of a training package on paraeducator’s use of EMT with a child dyad and subsequent child communication gains. Data is presented for four paraeducators and seven preschool children with DD. A visual analysis of the data is presented, in addition to an interpretation of Tau-U and Hedge’s g effect sizes. Results indicate increases in paraeducator’s fidelity of implementation of EMT, with large effects. There were increases in child communication, with large effects for prompted communication and small effects for independent communication. Paraeducators were able to generalize their use of strategies across additional students in the preschool classroom. The results of the study have promising implications regarding successful training procedures for paraeducators working with young children with DD. Future research should continue to examine effective, yet more cost-effective training programs for paraeducators.
Analysis of a Multilevel Consultation Model to Support Paraprofessionals’ Implementation of Behavioral Interventions in Preschool
JAKE MAHON (University of Oregon)
Abstract: Paraprofessionals spend the most time with the neediest students, but receive the least amount of training and support. All target students in the study had developmental disabilities, were between the ages of three and five, and had a history of challenging behavior. Paraprofessionals in the study were recruited because they had the least experience and training administering behavior support plans (BSPs) in their setting. A multi-level consultation model was used to train paraprofessionals to implement individualized BSPs. First, paraprofessionals were trained in a one-on-one setting how to implement the BSPs using behavioral skills training. Next, adherence to the BSP was monitored by independent observers and additional support was delivered contingent on meeting an adherence criterion. Through a cascading logic, data showed that paraprofessionals engaged in immediately and substantively higher levels of BSP adherence following application of the multilevel consultation model, and as a result, students engaged in immediately and substantively lower rates of challenging behavior (d = -1.5 to -4.4), which maintained over time. With minimal training provided to each paraprofessional across the study (M = 151.2 minutes), and dramatic observed changes in challenging behavior, the multilevel consultation model proved highly efficient and effective.
Teachers Coach Paraprofessionals to Implement Functional Communication Training in Preschool Classrooms
Mandy J. Rispoli (Purdue University), Emily Gregori (Purdue University), CATHARINE LORY (Purdue University), So Yeon Kim (Purdue University)
Abstract: The purpose of this study was to train teachers to coach paraprofessionals in the use of FCT to treat challenging behavior in young children with disabilities. Our first set of participants included a preschool special education teacher, a paraprofessional, and a child aged five years. We utilized a non-concurrent multiple baseline design across three paraprofessionals to examine the effects of practice-based coaching on (a) FCT treatment fidelity of the paraprofessional, and (b) challenging behavior and appropriate communication of the child. We trained teachers in FCT and coaching procedures, after which the teachers trained their paraprofessionals in FCT and provided coaching throughout the intervention phase. Our preliminary results with the first set of participants indicated the paraprofessional was able to implement FCT independently with high fidelity, which led to a decrease in challenging behavior and increase in appropriate communication in the child. Implications for future research and practice will be discussed.

 

Symposium #207
CE Offered: BACB
Innovations in Parent Training for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Reaching New Populations and Skills
Sunday, May 27, 2018
9:00 AM–10:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom H
Area: AUT; Domain: Applied Research
Chair: Sarah Grace Hansen (Georgia State University)
Discussant: Rachel Seaman (Emory University)
Abstract: A large and growing body of literature is available on effective interventions to address the core deficits of autism spectrum disorder and related comorbidities (i.e., challenging behavior). For young children with autism, however, it becomes important to target these behaviors through the training of natural change agents like parents to implement these supports. Parent training on strategies to improve social communication and decrease challenging behavior is of particular interest to increase overall family quality of life. This symposium will present a series of studies using innovative methodologies to train parents on core deficits and co-morbidities of autism spectrum disorder, including parents who may typically be at risk of missing out on critical services. This symposium will include results of a study that trained parents to complete brief functional analyses to better understand challenging behavior taking place at home, a parent training on increasing parent child interactions for Hispanic parents of children with autism, a home-based parent training for early social communication skills for young children with autism, and a parent training delivered via telehealth for families in rural settings. Implications for overcoming barriers to parent training and tailoring parent training practices to unique populations will be discussed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): culturally responsive, parent training, social communication, Telehealth
Parent-Implemented Brief Functional Analysis in the Home
STEPHANIE GEROW (Baylor University), Gabriela Juanita Rivera (Baylor University), Abby Hodges (Baylor University), Supriya Radhakrishnan (Baylor University)
Abstract: Children often engage in different patterns of challenging behavior with their parents as compared to professionals. For this reason, it is important to include parents in the assessment of challenging behavior if the intended intervention agent is the parent. The purpose of the present study was to assess the accuracy and feasibility of a parent-implemented brief functional analysis in the home setting. A parent-implemented brief functional analysis, using a brief reversal design, was implemented with each participant. Following the functional analysis, the experimenters conducted a treatment evaluation utilizing an alternating treatment design. The conditions in the alternating treatment design were functional communication training and baseline. Results from the first participant indicate that the brief functional analysis led to the development of an effective function-based intervention. In addition, the brief functional analysis required fewer than 90 minutes and the parent rated the brief functional analysis as socially valid. Data collection is ongoing and we plan to conduct the procedures with at least two more parent-child dyads, for a total of three parent-child dyads. We anticipate that data collection will be complete in February 2018.
Initial Results From a Brief Telehealth Parent Training Package: Feasibility of the Program, Impact on Parent Knowledge, and Reported Parent Stressors
LESLIE NEELY (University of Texas at San Antonio), Sarah Grace Hansen (Georgia State University), Amarie Carnett (University of North Texas), Chelsea Hardt (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract: The field of telehealth has emerged as a potential means of disseminating applied behavior analytic services to rural communities and underserved areas. The purpose of this project was to provide parent-directed treatment for individuals with autism spectrum disorder with supervision and training provided by a Board Certified Behavior Analyst—Doctoral Level via telehealth. The two-year project aims to train 550 parents of children with autism in ABA techniques to address a priority problem for their family. The project is now in the second year and initial data collected regarding the feasibility and usability of the program, program impacts on parent knowledge of targeted skill, and reported parental stressors will be presented. Preliminary results indicate statistically significant change in parent knowledge of targeted skills following training (p < .001). There were also significant correlations between moderators like education level and family size with both pre-test and post-test scores (p < 0.05). Implications for practice and future research will be discussed.
Teaching Hispanic Parents of Children With Autism to Deliver a Responsive Interaction Communication Intervention
RUSSELL LANG (Texas State University-San Marcos), Katherine Ledbetter-Cho (Texas State University), Caitlin Murphy (Texas State University)
Abstract: Parental involvement in early behavioral intervention for children with autism has been shown to improve outcomes; however, there is limited research involving Hispanic parents. We taught six Hispanic mothers to provide a child-directed naturalistic behavioral intervention package that emphasized responsive interaction with their young children with autism. A concurrent multiple baseline across parent-child dyads and standardized measures of child language outcomes were used to evaluate parents’ treatment fidelity and children’s response to intervention. Social validity data were also collected. Results suggest parents acquired the intervention skills and that children’s verbal utterance frequency and mean length of utterance improved. Although experimental control was evidenced in the multiple baseline design, there was no statistically significant difference in the standardized assessments of expressive and receptive language in the children. Social validity data suggested the training program and intervention procedures were acceptable, effective, and efficient. Child outcomes were rated as meaningful improvements. The importance of replication and extension with understudied populations is discussed with emphasis on social validity measures. Limitations to the current study are noted and addressed in suggestions for future research.
Parent-Implemented Early Social Communication Skill Intervention
BUKET ERTURK (University of Oregon), Sarah Grace Hansen (Georgia State University), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon), Megan G. Kunze (University of Oregon)
Abstract: Numerous developmental difficulties are noted to differentiate young children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) from typically developing children and these developmental disabilities center on social and communication skills. These skills include but are not limited to imitation skills, manding, and joint attention. In the current study, we used a multiple baseline design across these three behaviors for two child-parent dyads to investigate the effectiveness and generalization of a parent-implemented social-communication intervention. Parents received training on the use of least-to-most prompting strategies as well as general strategies and coaching until they reached the criterion for treatment fidelity. Results indicated that parents’ fidelity of implementation increased following parent training and coaching. In addition, there was an increase in child participants’ imitation, manding, and response to joint attention skills. Both parents and children were able to generalize the increased skills to novel stimuli. The results of the study are discussed regarding the impact of parent behaviors on generalization and maintenance of child behaviors. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

 

Symposium #257
CE Offered: BACB
Evaluating Behavioral Parent Education Programs to Improve Family Routines for Children With Autism
Sunday, May 27, 2018
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall B
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Meme Hieneman, Ph.D.
Chair: Meme Hieneman (Positive Behavior Support Applications)
Discussant: Laura Lee McIntyre (University of Oregon)
Abstract: Approximately 1 in every 4 children with autism experience significant behavioral challenges (Kaat & Lecavelier, 2013). Behavioral parent training has been demonstrated to be effective, especially when the principles can be applied within the context of family life (Lucyshyn et al., 2015). Unfortunately, only about one-half of parents complete such training, and many do not implement strategies consistently (Chacko et al, 2016). Stress has been suggested as primary contributors to this nonadherence (Dumas, Wolf, Fisman, & Culligan, 2009). Therefore, it may be beneficial to integrate practices known to protect parents against such risks? such as mindfulness (Singh et al., 2014) ? into behavioral parent training, an approach we refer to as Practiced Routines (PR). Two studies (a randomized comparison trial and single-case design) that evaluated the effects of the PR parent training program will be presented. The PR program teaches parents to apply comprehensive, function-based behavioral and mindfulness practices within the context of natural family routines. This training is designed to be delivered in three weeks with homework in between. Whereas the participants showed significant improvements in parent and child outcomes, both studies showed variability in responding. This may indicate that there is a need for adaptations in administration, including possibly multiple levels of intervention targeted to parents? and/or children?s needs. Abstract 1: A randomized trial was used to evaluate PR and an active comparison condition (Teaching Routines; TR). TR was a self-directed online program focused on using applied behavior analysis principles to teach daily routines (e.g., task analysis, environmental arrangement). The PR program included similar content, but focused more on functions and incorporated mindfulness practice. In addition, PR was facilitated by parent educators via online meetings. Seventy-seven parents participated in the PR group and 79 participated in TR. Outcome measures included child behavior ratings (adaptive and maladaptive), knowledge about ABA principles, parental stress, self-efficacy, mindful parenting, and family quality of life. Statistical analyses indicate that both groups experienced significant improvements across measures immediately following treatment and at follow-up. Post treatment, the PR group reported improvement in child adaptive behavior, which TR did not. Parenting stress reduction was evident at both post-treatment and follow-up for the PR group. Differences in knowledge were the only condition effects, with PR demonstrating significantly more knowledge gains at both posttest and follow-up. Data and examples of the program elements will be displayed, along with a discussion of methodological issues that could have led the results and implications for additional research. Abstract 2: A concurrent randomized multiple baseline across three mother-child dyads single-case design was employed to evaluate the effects of the Practiced Routines program delivered face-to-face. Three mothers and their children (ages three, five, and eight years old) with autism spectrum disorder participated. Data were collected during naturally-occurring family routines (playtime with sibling, cleaning up toys, and dinner). Increases in parent behavioral strategy use were observed for two of three mothers. Child challenging behavior decreased for two of three dyads. Visual analysis combined with a standardized mean difference analysis (Hedge?s g) revealed mixed results, with a medium effect found for increases in behavioral strategy use and small-moderate effects found for decreases in parent stress and child challenging behavior at the study level. One mother qualified for follow-up coaching, which involved performance feedback that further increased the level of her independent use of behavioral strategies. All three mothers rated the social validity of the program favorably. Implications for research and practice will be discussed.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): family routines, mindfulness, parent training, parenting stress
Target Audience: Behavior analysts
Randomized Comparison Trial to Evaluate Two Online Parent Education Programs Focused on Improving Family Routines for Children With Autism
MEME HIENEMAN (Positive Behavior Support Applications), Jordan Pennefather (IRIS Educational Media)
Abstract: A randomized trial was used to evaluate PR and an active comparison condition (Teaching Routines; TR). TR was a self-directed online program focused on using applied behavior analysis principles to teach daily routines (e.g., task analysis, environmental arrangement). The PR program included similar content, but focused more on functions and incorporated mindfulness practice. In addition, PR was facilitated by parent educators via online meetings. Seventy-seven parents participated in the PR group and 79 participated in TR. Outcome measures included child behavior ratings (adaptive and maladaptive), knowledge about ABA principles, parental stress, self-efficacy, mindful parenting, and family quality of life. Statistical analyses indicate that both groups experienced significant improvements across measures immediately following treatment and at follow-up. Post treatment, the PR group reported improvement in child adaptive behavior, which TR did not. Parenting stress reduction was evident at both post-treatment and follow-up for the PR group. Differences in knowledge were the only condition effects, with PR demonstrating significantly more knowledge gains at both posttest and follow-up. Data and examples of the program elements will be displayed, along with a discussion of methodological issues that could have led the results and implications for additional research.
Concurrent Randomized Multiple Baseline Study to Evaluate a Mindfulness-Infused Behavioral Parent Education Program Focused on Improving Family Routines for Children With Autism
TRACY JANE RAULSTON (Pennsylvania State University), Patricia Zemantic (University of Oregon), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon)
Abstract: A concurrent randomized multiple baseline across three mother-child dyads single-case design was employed to evaluate the effects of the Practiced Routines program delivered face-to-face. Three mothers and their children (ages three, five, and eight years old) with autism spectrum disorder participated. Data were collected during naturally-occurring family routines (playtime with sibling, cleaning up toys, and dinner). Increases in parent behavioral strategy use were observed for two of three mothers. Child challenging behavior decreased for two of three dyads. Visual analysis combined with a standardized mean difference analysis (Hedge’s g) revealed mixed results, with a medium effect found for increases in behavioral strategy use and small-moderate effects found for decreases in parent stress and child challenging behavior at the study level. One mother qualified for follow-up coaching, which involved performance feedback that further increased the level of her independent use of behavioral strategies. All three mothers rated the social validity of the program favorably. Implications for research and practice will be discussed.

Poster Sessions

Poster Session #277
Sunday, May 27, 2018
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Pacific Ballroom
Chair: Jessica Singer-Dudek (Teachers College, Columbia University)

 

132. Increasing Natural Reinforcement During Academic Tasks for Children With Autism in Inclusive Classrooms
Area: AUT/EDC; Domain: Applied Research
LINDSAY GLUGATCH (University of Oregon), Robert L. Koegel (Stanford University; University of California, Santa Barbara), Mian Wang (University of California, Santa Barbara), Kelsey Oliver (University of California, Santa Barbara)
Discussant: Russell Lang (Texas State University-San Marcos)
Abstract: Many children with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) show little to no interest in academic assignments that are challenging or uninteresting. This may lead to increases in disruptive behavior in order to avoid or escape non-preferred tasks. By incorporating motivational components of Pivotal Response Treatment (PRT) in homework tasks, previous studies have found faster completion rates, decreases in disruptive behavior, and improved interest (Koegel, Singh, Koegel, 2010). Overall, there is a substantial body of evidence indicating that motivation plays an important role in academic success, however, there is a gap in the literature about the incorporation of motivational strategies during academic tasks for children with ASD in classrooms. This study uses an alternating treatments design to investigate student behavior and the percentage of correct responses in reading and writing tasks during two conditions: a) Premack Principle condition and b) Natural Reinforcement Condition. The results suggested that incorporating natural reinforcers into academic tasks increased student interest, affect, and percentage of letters/words correct for two elementary students.

 

Symposium

Symposium #341
CE Offered: BACB
Current Research for Training Parents, Educators, and Direct-Care Staff to Implement Behavioral Assessment and Treatment
Sunday, May 27, 2018
5:00 PM–6:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom AB
Area: DDA/AUT; Domain: Applied Research
CE Instructor: Patrick Romani, Ph.D.
Chair: Patrick Romani (University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus)
Discussant: Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon)
Abstract: Training others to implement behavioral assessment and treatment procedures expands accessibility for behavior analytic services. While much research has demonstrated procedures for teaching these procedures, additional research is needed to train others in more efficient and cost-effective means (Blackman & Jimenez-Gomez; Romani, Boorse, Carson, & Loving) or in unique areas (Nipe; Suberman & Cividini-Motta). Nipe and Suberman and Cividini-Motta provide data showing effective ways to train others to implement physical restraint procedures (Nipe) or in the use of speech-generating devices (Suberman & Cividini-Motta). The next two symposia present current research on the use of telehealth to expand access to these training services. Blackman and Jimenez-Gomez compare two modalities of remote training in the context of caregiver training, and Romani and colleagues present current research on the use of telehealth to train educators to implement behavioral assessment procedures. After listening to these presentations, audience members will become familiar with strategies to teach others to use behavioral assessment and treatment procedures via in-vivo and remote modes of instruction.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Keyword(s): Augmentative Communication, Behavioral-Skills Training, Physical Management, Telehealth
Target Audience: The target audience for this symposium will be certified behavior analysts and educators who want to learn new ways to train their staff to implement behavioral assessment and treatment procedures.
Effectiveness of Online Vs. In-vivo Training for Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder
ABIGAIL BLACKMAN (University of Kansas), Samuel Shvarts (Florida Institute of Technology), Corina Jimenez-Gomez (The Scott Center for Autism Treatment, Florida Institute of Technology)
Abstract: Individuals diagnosed with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) often receive Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) to acquire skills. However, these skills often do not generalize and/or maintain without parental involvement in behavioral treatment. Parent training is commonly provided in-vivo, which can be costly, time consuming, and inaccessible to some families. There have been a number of studies which have validated the effectiveness of online training for parents of children with ASD. However, there has yet to be a study to conduct a direct comparison of the effects of in-vivo versus online training. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to evaluate the efficacy of online, self-paced modules (i.e., asynchronous training) to in-vivo parent training sessions. Effectiveness was evaluated by comparing pre- and post-intervention measures, with both direct and indirect behavioral measures being utilized. Of the four dependent variables assessed, the direct behavioral measures of positive parent-child interaction and knowledge assessment score improved significantly for parents in online and in-vivo groups, but not for the parents in the control group. These results suggest that online training can be a cost-effective alternative for the delivery of parent training and potentially other behavior-analytic services.
The Effects of Rate-Building on the Demonstration of Physical Management Procedures
TIMOTHY NIPE (Melmark)
Abstract: The nature of some challenging behaviors such as aggression and self-injury may require the use of manual restraint to ensure the safety of the individuals targeted by these behaviors. There are significant risks that these procedures pose to both those who implement them as well as for those who are being restrained (Weiss, 1998; Lee, et al., 2001). Staff training is widely considered one of the most important methods to decrease these risks to staff and clients during physical management (Fisher, 1995), however there remains a paucity of research demonstrating effective training of behavioral safety curriculums and retention of physical management skills (Bell & Stark, 2006; Lee et al., 2001). The majority of behavioral crisis training curricula employ accuracy as the measure of competency of manual restraint procedures. However, research has demonstrated training packages that include a criterion combining rate with accuracy may have benefits for trainees beyond those that utilize accuracy as the sole measure of mastery (Binder, 2003). This study explores the potential benefits of a training package consisting of timed practice, fluency aims based on the rate of performance by experts, and access to visual representation of ongoing performance, on the demonstration of physical management procedures.
Teaching Caregivers to Implement Speech-Generating Device-Based Mand Training: Evaluating the Efficacy of Behavioral Skills Training
RACHEL SUBERMAN (University of South Florida), Catia Cividini-Motta (University of South Florida)
Abstract: Many individuals with developmental disabilities do not develop vocal repertoires. Thus, teaching the use of an augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) device is imperative. A speech-generating device (SGD) is an example of an AAC that is universally understood. Individuals with developmental disabilities have been taught to communicate using such device. Teaching caregivers to conduct communication training with their children may be one to way to foster communication in an individual’s natural environment. Thus, the purpose of this study was to extend previous research by using behavioral skills training (BST) to teach caregivers to implement SGD-based mand training using an adapted training sequence. Additionally, we evaluated whether training caregivers to implement mand training with their children resulted in an increase of independent mands emitted by their children. This study found that BST was effective in teaching caregivers to implement SGD-based mand training with their children. Additionally, independent mands increased from pre-training to post-training observations for two children.
Training Educators to Conduct Stimulus Preference Assessments via Telehealth in School Settings
PATRICK ROMANI (University of Colorado, Anschutz Medical Campus), Andrea Boorse (University of Denver), Brooke Carson (Colorado Department of Education), Kate Marie Loving (Colorado Department of Education), Antoinette Donaldson (Children’s Hospital Colorado)
Abstract: We present data from six educators who participated in a training program to learn functional behavior assessment skills conducted via telehealth. Schools employing the educators were an average of 166 miles from Children’s Hospital Colorado. Interobserver agreement was collected on an average of 33% of sessions for each child and averaged 90%. Within a multiple baseline across participants, we first collected baseline data on educator implementation of the multiple stimulus without replacement preference assessment (MSWO) when they were only given a protocol to review prior to conducting the assessment. Following baseline, a training program matched to individual skill deficits was conducted to increase procedural fidelity. After each educator conducted at least 80% of steps on the preference assessment accurately, we evaluated maintenance by having the educator conduct the preference assessment with a student diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder enrolled at their school. Results showed that fidelity of MSWO assessment implementation increased following training delivered via telehealth and maintained when implemented with a student. The current study will be discussed in terms of how telehealth can be an effective way to expand training opportunities for educators.

 

Panels

Invited Panel #201
CE Offered: PSY/BACB/QABA/NASP
Is Evolution Science the Umbrella? Creating an Integrated Framework for Understanding, Predicting, and Influencing Human Behavior
Sunday, May 27, 2018
8:00 AM–9:50 AM
Marriott Marquis, Grand Ballroom 7-9
Area: SCI
CE Instructor: Michael J. Dougher, Ph.D.
Chair: Michael J. Dougher (University of New Mexico)
YVONNE BARNES-HOLMES (Ghent University)
ANTHONY BIGLAN (Oregon Research Institute)
STEVEN C. HAYES (University of Nevada, Reno)
DAVID SLOAN WILSON (Binghamton University)
Dr. Barnes-Holmes is a professor in the department of Experimental Clinical and Health Psychology at Ghent University. Her interests include relational frame theory, contextual behavior science, and acceptance and commitment therapy.
Anthony Biglan, Ph.D., is a Senior Scientist at Oregon Research Institute. He is the author of The Nurture Effect: How the Science of Human Behavior Can Improve our Lives and Our World. Dr. Biglan has been conducting research on the development and prevention of child and adolescent problem behavior for the past 30 years. His work has included studies of the risk and protective factors associated with tobacco, alcohol, and other drug use; high-risk sexual behavior; and antisocial behavior. He has conducted numerous experimental evaluations of interventions to prevent tobacco use both through school-based programs and community-wide interventions. And, he has evaluated interventions to prevent high-risk sexual behavior, antisocial behavior, and reading failure. In recent years, his work has shifted to more comprehensive interventions that have the potential to prevent the entire range of child and adolescent problems. He and colleagues at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences published a book summarizing the epidemiology, cost, etiology, prevention, and treatment of youth with multiple problems (Biglan et al., 2004). He is a former president of the Society for Prevention Research. He was a member of the Institute of Medicine Committee on Prevention, which released its report in 2009 documenting numerous evidence-based preventive interventions that can prevent multiple problems. As a member of Oregon’s Alcohol and Drug Policy Commission, he is helping to develop a strategic plan for implementing comprehensive evidence-based interventions throughout Oregon. Information about Dr. Biglan’s publications can be found at http://www.ori.org/scientists/anthony_biglan.
Dr. Hayes received his Ph.D. from West Virginia University and currently serves as professor in the behavior analysis program in the Department of Psychology at the University of Nevada, Reno. Dr. Hayes has a record of voluminous research and substantial impact, within behavior analysis and beyond, with 43 books and more than 600 publications. He is one of only three behavior analysts in the world with an h-index above 100 in Google Scholar (www.webometrics.info/en/node/58). He is the principal developer of relational frame theory and acceptance and commitment therapy, highly influential behavior analytic approaches to language and cognition, and evidence-based intervention, respectively, that have generated considerable research and achieved widespread adoption. Dr. Hayes’s contributions to teaching and service have also been exemplary. He served as department chair at UNR, and with Linda Hayes launched the behavior analysis program there. Dr. Hayes has held many influential service (e.g., president of Division 25, the Association for Contextual Behavioral Science [ACBS], and the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies [ABCT]) and editorial (e.g., AE of JABA) positions, and has received numerous awards for his work (e.g., the SABA Awards for International Dissemination of Behavior Analysis and the Impact of Science on Application, the APA Don Hake Award, and the Lifetime Achievement Award from ABCT). His contributions span philosophical, methodological, basic, and applied domains with remarkable breadth and depth.
David Sloan Wilson is SUNY Distinguished Professor of Biology and Anthropology at Binghamton University and President of the Evolution Institute, a nonprofit organization that formulates public policy from an evolutionary perspective. He has made foundational contributions to evolutionary theory and is widely credited for helping to revive Multilevel Selection Theory, which explains how adaptations can evolve (or fail to evolve) at any level of a multi-tier hierarchy of biological or human social units. He has also been influential in expanding the study of evolution beyond the biological sciences to include all aspects of humanity, both inside and outside the Ivory Tower. His books include Darwin’s Cathedral: Evolution, Religion, and the Nature of Society (2002), Evolution for Everyone: How Darwin’s Theory Can Change the Way We Think About Our Lives (2007), The Neighborhood Project: Using Evolution to Improve my City, One Block at a Time (2011), and Does Altruism Exist? Culture, Genes, and the Welfare of Others (2015). His next book, titled This View of Life: Completing the Darwinian Revolution and Evolving the Future, will be published in 2019.
Abstract: Since before Skinner’s “Selection by consequences,” behavior analysts have acknowledged the natural alliance among the sciences that commonly rely on selection as a fundamental cause and sufficient explanation of behavior. In that vein, several behavior analysts have explicitly called for a closer integration of evolution and behavior science, and some have incorporated evolutionary principles in proposed expansions and modifications of behavior theory. However, it is only recently that a fully integrated, data-driven, evolution-based science of behavior has emerged with both conceptual and empirical implications for behavior scientists. A fundamental assumption of this approach is the reciprocal influence of evolution on behavioral processes at multiple levels of analysis, individual, symbolic and cultural. The participants in this panel are the principal architects of this integration, and each will discuss their specific conceptual and empirical contributions. A panel discussion format was selected specifically to allow audience participation in the discussion.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Board certified behavior analysts; licensed psychologists; graduate students.
Learning Objectives: PENDING

 

 Panel #229
CE Offered: BACB
Doctoral Training for Behavior Analysts: A New Community of Reinforcement Awaits Today’s Practitioners
Sunday, May 27, 2018
10:00 AM–10:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Harbor Ballroom D-F
Area: TBA/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan G. Kunze, M.A.
Chair: Megan G. Kunze (University of Oregon)
WENDY A. MACHALICEK (University of Oregon)
TONYA NICHOLE DAVIS (Baylor University)
MANDY J. RISPOLI (Purdue University)
Abstract: The indicators of high quality training of behavior analysts who will work as practitioners remain somewhat controversial. Some researchers argue that faculty research productivity is correlated to improved practitioner training (Dixon, Reed, Smith, Belisle, & Jackson, 2015) while others have argued for alternative quality indicators of training programs including exam pass rates (e.g. Ahearn, Green, Riordan, & Weatherly, 2015). An inescapable reality is that high quality doctoral training programs provide the essential faculty to enter into the training pipeline and as such promoting practitioner entry into doctoral training programs should be a consideration for improving the quality of practitioner training. Doctoral training programs in applied behavior analysis and related fields provide future scholars with advanced coursework, but also apprenticeship in research design and supervised college teaching. A panel of faculty from doctoral training programs in special education and educational psychology discuss the following topics: (a) if and why practitioners should consider a Ph.D., (b) selection of a Ph.D. program and faculty advisor, (c) developing a competitive application for doctoral programs, (d) funding Ph.D. program, and (e) life after the Ph.D. as faculty.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: board certified behavior analysts; graduate students; faculty in doctoral degree granting programs
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: 1. verbally articulate the reasons why practitioners should consider obtaining a Ph.D., 2. discuss strategies for selection of a Ph.D. program and faculty advisor, 3. list the components of a competitive application for a research intensive doctoral program
Keyword(s): doctoral training

 

Panel #297
CE Offered: BACB
Ethical Supervision of ABA Services Across Diverse Service Providers and Settings
Sunday, May 27, 2018
3:00 PM–3:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom C
Area: PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Megan G. Kunze, M.A.
Chair: Jessica Franco (University of Texas at Austin)
MEGAN G. KUNZE (University of Oregon)
BERENICE DE LA CRUZ (Autism Community Network)
LUPE CASTANEDA (Behavior Pathways, LLC)
Abstract: Board Certified Behavior Analysts supervise diverse service providers, those working toward their initial certification and those needing ongoing supervision (e.g., BCaBAs, RBTs), in different settings. Supervision may include behavior skills training with students at universities, teachers in schools, BCaBAs and RBTs in clinics and homes, and parents in homes and in the community. Effectiveness of the supervision may vary across these settings and supervisees (Dixon et al. 2016; Neely, Rispoli, Gerow, & Hong 2016; Stahmer et al., 2015). Thus, supervisors need to plan appropriate means of teaching and assessing in the various circumstances (Carr & Nosik, 2017). While the BACB provides extensive training and resources on the standards for effective supervision of those seeking certification, we have less information on how to adapt to the changing supervision needs across settings, especially for those who are receiving on-going supervision. Panelists will share their experience on various supervision scenarios they have encountered with diverse service providers in different settings. Panelists will discuss ethical issues that may arise during supervision and guidance on how to uphold the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2016). Participants are encouraged to ask questions and seek recommendations about their own experiences.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: This presentation is geared toward BCBAs who are supervisors of RBTs and BCaBAs. Participants will have the opportunity to ask questions about their experiences as a supervisor and ethical challenges involved in fulfilling the role.
Learning Objectives: Participants will have the opportunity to: 1. reflect on their own professional experiences as well as learn from the panel and audience participants, 2. gain knowledge of current research on supervision practices of BCBAs for BCaBAs and RBTs, and 3. advance understanding of the Professional and Ethical Compliance Code for Behavior Analysts (Behavior Analyst Certification Board, 2016).

 

Program by Day for Monday, May 28, 2018

Symposia

Symposium #436
CE Offered: BACB
Diversity in Research: Linguistic Variables in the Assessment and Treatment of Challenging Behavior, Recruitment and Retention of Diverse Participants, and Bilingual Learners With Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, May 28, 2018
10:00 AM–11:50 AM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Seaport Ballroom F
Area: AUT/PRA
CE Instructor: Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau, M.Ed.
Chair: Christine Drew (University of Oregon)
Discussant: Yaniz C. Padilla Dalmau (Seattle Children’s Hospital)
Abstract: The population of the United States has been increasingly culturally and linguistically diverse for many years. In spite of this growing diversity, these groups are significantly underrepresented in the research literature for applied behavior analysis and special education. Practice guidelines have not been developed to address the needs of these populations, many of whom are served by behavior analysts. Previous research has found that language preference and language of intervention are some of the variables that need to be systematically addressed through research applications. This symposium will include the results of two intervention studies focusing on how linguistic differences affect intervention generalization (FCT), behavioral assessment (functional analysis), language preference, and skill acquisition. To aid researchers and practitioners working directly with these groups, a position paper reviewing bilingual literature and providing recommendations for practice for bilingual learners with ASD and a systematic literature review on the recruitment and retention of participants in research who are economically, linguistically, and culturally diverse are also included. Practice recommendations and areas of future research for these growing populations will be presented.
Instruction Level: Basic
Keyword(s): bilingualism, challenging behavior, diverse participants, language preference
Target Audience: Practitioners and researchers
Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to list strategies for working with bilingual families. Participants will be able to list strategies for recruiting and retaining diverse participants in ASD research. Participants will be able to summarize the current research addressing linguistic preference in FA and FCT methodology and skill acquisition.
Impact of Language on Behavior Assessment and Intervention Outcomes
(Applied Research)
JESSICA EMILY GRABER (University of Texas at San Antonio), Leslie Neely (University of Texas at San Antonio), S. Shanun Kunnavatana (Independent Researcher in Durham, NC), Katherine Cantrell (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract: Resurgence of problem behavior following effective functional communication training (FCT) can occur if the functional communication response (FCR) contacts a barrier, such as lack of generalization across communication partners. One barrier to generalization may be language variations among communication partners. We evaluated the effect of language of implementation on functional analysis and functional communication training outcomes for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Linguistic diversity and choice of language may be particularly important to children with ASD as core communication deficits often contribute to engagement in problem behavior. Participants were three children with ASD who engaged in problem behavior and whose parents reported Spanish was primarily spoken in the home setting. Assessment conducted in both English and Spanish identified the behaviors were maintained by escape from demands in both languages. FCT was conducted in the English language and probes for generalization to the Spanish language were conducted. Results indicate that intervention may generalize naturally across languages as one participant code switched. However, two participants required specific instruction in both languages. Implications for practice and future research will be discussed.
Evaluation of Language Preference on Skill Acquisition
(Applied Research)
KATHERINE CANTRELL (University of Texas at San Antonio), Leslie Neely (University of Texas at San Antonio), S. Shanun Kunnavatana (Independent Researcher in Durham, NC), Kyra Hastings (University of Texas at San Antonio)
Abstract: Recent research has suggested language of instruction may have an effect of the behavior of children with autism spectrum disorder during instructional sessions. This study aims to add to the literature base by evaluating preference of instructional language as a potential variable that may account for differences in problem behavior and skill acquisition during instructional settings. There were three participants for this study. All of the children were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. All of the participants came from a Spanish speaking family. In the first phase of the study, functional analysis were conducted in both English and Spanish. The results of functional analysis demonstrated the behavior was maintained by escape from demands. In the second phase of the study, a language preference assessment was conducted using a concurrent operant design embedded into an ABAB reversal. In the final phase, skill acquisition will be evaluated using novel responses in both English and Spanish with the schedule of reinforcement held constant.
Recruitment and Retention of Ethnically Diverse Participants in Autism Intervention Research
(Applied Research)
ALLAINA DOUGLAS (University of Oregon ), Christine Drew (University of Oregon), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon), Rebecca Crowe (University of Oregon), Lindsay Glugatch (University of Oregon)
Abstract: Special education intervention literature largely fails to report participant demographics; moreover, when race or ethnicity are reported, it reflects a homogeneous, majority culture (Artiles et al., 1997; Sinclair et al., in press; Vasquez et al., 2011). Researchers in special education and behavior analysis have called for an increase in diversity of participants with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and other developmental disorders (DD) (Sinclair et al., in press), but few studies have empirically evaluated the relation between recruitment and retention strategies and increased diversity for these participants. A conceptual framework for increasing the inclusion of diverse participants in research involving parents and children with ASD and other DD will be presented. Findings are presented from a systematic literature review (i.e. electronic database searches, ancestral search) from studies published between 2011-2016 evaluating recruitment and retention strategies and papers offering conceptual frameworks to recruit and retain diverse participants in parent implemented interventions. Findings are discussed across the 41studies in relation to variables such as: (a) demographics, (b) recruitment and retention strategies, (d) attrition rate, (e) social validity, etc. A conceptual framework for increasing the inclusion of diverse participants in research involving parents and their children with ASD and other DD will be presented.
Understanding the Linguistic Needs of Diverse Individuals With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Some Comments on the Research Literature and Suggestions for Clinicians
(Applied Research)
WAN HAN NATALY LIM (University of Texas at Austin), Mark O’Reilly (University of Texas at Austin), Jeffrey S. Sigafoos (Victoria University of Wellington), Giulio Lancioni (University of Bari)
Abstract: The practice of advising bilingual parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to speak in a single language, often the majority language of the region, with their child with ASD seems to be common. Such advice, however, is not grounded on empirical evidence but appears to be based more on logical arguments and assumptions. This presentation will discuss fears surrounding dual language exposure, empirical evidence supporting bilingualism in children with ASD, and key steps that clinicians can consider taking to better address the needs of diverse learners. Specifically, clinicians can inquire about a family’s language usage and preferences, address fears about dual language exposure, and support parents in their use of heritage language through parent training.

 

Paper Sessions

Paper Session #462
The Influence of Kitten Training and Socialization Classes on the Kitten-Human Bond
Monday, May 28, 2018
12:00 PM–12:20 PM
Marriott Marquis, Marina Ballroom D
Area: AAB
Instruction Level: Basic
Chair: Kristyn Vitale Shreve (Oregon State University)
The Influence of Kitten Training and Socialization Classes on the Kitten-Human Bond
Domain: Applied Research
KRISTYN VITALE SHREVE (Oregon State University), Monique Udell (Oregon State University )
Abstract: Despite the popularity of pet cats, relatively little scientific research has investigated how human interaction influences cat behavior. This study examined the influence of a training and socialization class on the kitten-human bond. Data was collected for 95 kittens aged 3-8 months at two time points. Both tests included a secure base test, allowing for categorization of kitten attachment style (secure or insecure) and a sociability test. Fifty kittens experienced a 6-week training and socialization class between testing sessions, 45 kittens served as controls. Preliminary results for 15 class and 15 control kittens do not indicate a significant difference in the number of individuals between groups classified as secure or insecure in either pre-test (p = 0.45) or post-test (p = 1). For sociability data, there was no significant difference in time spent near owner in the pre-test inattentive (p = 0.83) or attentive state (p = 0.58). The same was found in the post-testing (inattentive p = 0.88; attentive p = 0.19). Although preliminary data do not indicate training classes significantly influence kitten behavior, the full dataset may reveal other findings. Additionally, there may be other benefits to participation in classes, such as a change in owner perception.

 

Symposia

Symposium #466
CE Offered: BACB
Keeping What Works and Looking to Improve: Early Intervention in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Monday, May 28, 2018
12:00 PM–12:50 PM
Manchester Grand Hyatt, Grand Hall A
Area: AUT/PRA; Domain: Service Delivery
CE Instructor: Lynne Levato, Ph.D.
Chair: Lynne Levato (University of Rochester Medical Center)
Abstract: Applied behavior analysis (ABA) interventions, including at least some discrete trial teaching (DTT), are often considered the standard of care for preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder. However, it is unclear whether community agencies can sustain effective early ABA intervention over time. Also, alternatives to DTT, often emphasizing naturalistic child-led interactions, have generated increasing empirical support in recent years, and it is unclear how these approaches should be integrated into ABA interventions. In this symposium, the first presentation documents sustainability of effective services in a quasi-experimental study of 94 participants, age 18-75 months at onset of intervention, seen for three years (48 children in early intensive ABA at a community agency and 46 matched children in early childhood services as usual). The second presentation shows single subject data for eight participants, age 2-5 years, in a Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial aimed at tailoring DTT and Verbal Behavior techniques to the needs of individual children. The third presentation describes a three-center, randomized clinical trial that compared DTT to an empirically supported naturalistic developmental behavioral intervention, JASPER, in 161 children, age 33-54 months. Although DTT and JASPER differ markedly in intervention content and method, outcomes were mostly similar across interventions.
Instruction Level: Intermediate
Target Audience: Providers and researchers who work in early intervention for children with autism spectrum disorder
Learning Objectives: 1. Summarize outcomes of early intensive behavioral intervention in community settings 2. Define a Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial 3. List three key features of naturalistic developmental behavioral interventions 4. Summarize findings from studies that compare discrete trial teaching to naturalistic, child-led teaching formats
Sustainability of Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention for Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Community Setting
CHANTI FRITZSCHING WATERS (Central Valley Autism Project, Inc.), Mila A. Amerine Dickens (Central Valley Autism Project, Inc.), Sally Thurston (University of Rochester Medical Center), Xiang Lu (University of Rochester Medical Center), Tristram Smith (University of Rochester Medical Center)
Abstract: This study examined whether outcomes in early intensive behavioral intervention (EIBI) during a university-led multisite project could be replicated by the same community agency independently of the project. Participants, age 18-75 months at onset of intervention, were 48 children with autism spectrum disorder enrolled in 35 hours per week of publicly-funded, community-based EIBI for three years and 46 children who were matched on baseline characteristics and received early childhood services as usual (SAU) through local early childhood special education providers. Linear mixed models indicated that EIBI participants improved significantly more than SAU participants on standardized tests of IQ, nonverbal IQ, adaptive behavior, and academic achievement, administered by independent evaluators. Although limited by the use of a matched comparison group rather than random assignment, the study provides evidence for the sustainability of effective EIBI in community settings for children with ASD who start intervention at varying ages throughout early childhood.
Preliminary Comparison of Two Models of Low-Intensity Behavior Analytic Intervention for Preschool Children With Autism
Mary Louise E. Kerwin (Rowan University), Michelle Ennis Soreth (Rowan University), VICTOR CHIN (Rowan University), Vincent Joseph Carbone (Carbone Clinic), Tristram Smith (University of Rochester Medical Center)
Abstract: As high as 47-48% of children receiving Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) have been reported to experience optimal outcomes; however, the responses of children who do not respond optimally to EIBI vary widely. One source of variability in treatment response may be the model of EIBI implemented. Preliminary data will be presented from a 16-week treatment outcome study comparing two behavior analytic models of Early Intensive Behavioral Intervention (EIBI) for children ages 2-5 years old diagnosed with autism: 1) the Lovaas/UCLA Model (LM) and 2) the Verbal Behavior Model (VBM). The study used a dynamic experimental design (i.e., Sequential Multiple Assignment Randomized Trial; SMART) developed to inform adaptive treatment strategies. Participants were randomly assigned either to low-intensity LM or VBM conditions and received 90-minute sessions 3 times/week. At the end of the first 8 weeks, it was determined whether the child was responding to the intervention. Participants slow to respond were randomly assigned to receive either an intensified version of the initial intervention or the unassigned intervention for an additional 8 weeks. Preliminary empirical evidence of participants’responses to LM and VBM conditions will be presented and we will discuss how the outcomes of the study inform adaptive treatment decisions.
Randomized Trial of Early Intervention for Spoken Communication in Autism Spectrum Disorder
Tristram Smith (University of Rochester Medical Center), Connie Kasari (University of California, Los Angeles), Rebecca Landa (Kennedy Krieger Institute), DANIEL W. MRUZEK (University of Rochester Medical Center), Stephanie Shire (University of Oregon), Wendy Shih (University of California Los Angeles), Dana Herman (Kennedy Krieger Institute), Damla Senturk (University of California Los Angeles)
Abstract: ABA interventions that emphasize discrete trial teaching (DTT) are well-established for preschoolers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and limited language. Other approaches apply naturalistic, developmental behavioral interventions (NDBIs), which aim to increase social engagement by providing learning opportunities during back-and-forth interpersonal interaction, often involving child-led play. We compared DTT to an empirically supported NDBI, the Interpersonal Developmental Approach (IDA) consisting primarily of JASPER. Participants were 161 children with ASD, age 33-54 months, with limited language (<30 initiated spoken words), randomized to DTT (n=82) or IDA (n=79) for one-hour intervention sessions 5x/week for six months. Outcome measures (administered at baseline, end-of-treatment, and six-month follow-up) included the Reynell Developmental Language Scales, Mullen Scales of Early Learning, and Early Social Communication Scales (an observation of nonverbal communication, including frequency of initiations of joint attention, IJA). Generalized linear mixed models indicated both groups improved over time. Outcomes did not differ between groups on the Reynell or Mullen. For participants who did not display IJA at baseline, IJA outcomes did not differ between groups; however, participants with IJA at baseline had better IJA outcomes in IDA than DTT, F(1,159)=4.44, p=0.037. Overall, despite differing intervention content and method, DTT and IDA led to mostly similar outcomes.

 

Poster Sessions

Poster Session #476
Monday, May 28, 2018
1:00 PM–3:00 PM
Marriott Marquis, Grand Ballroom 1-6
Chair: Eric S. Murphy (University of Alaska Anchorage)
90. Wisconsin Promise Tele-Behavioral Consultation to Decrease Challenging Behavior in Adolescents With Developmental Disabilities
Area: AUT/DDA; Domain: Applied Research
CHRISTINE DREW (University of Oregon), Wendy A. Machalicek (University of Oregon), Qi Wei (University of Oregon), Ellie C. Hartman (University of Wisconsin-Stout)
Abstract: Individuals with developmental disabilities face worsened post-secondary outcomes. In an effort to mitigate barriers, Wisconsin Promise has provided additional services to Social Security recipients, including tele-behavioral consultation where shortages of BCBAs exist in collaboration with University of Oregon. A 17-year-old with autism and her father were referred to address vocal stereotypy (VS) and aggression occasioned by interruption of VS. Consultation procedures were implemented at a distance using telehealth equipment. Following indirect functional behavior assessment, the parent implemented a multielement and alternating treatment functional analysis (FA). Results of the FA suggested that VS was automatically maintained. The effects of matched stimuli (auditory input) was assessed; rate of VS was minimally affected by the addition of matched stimuli. The parent implemented each strategy (response interruption and redirection (RIRD), differential reinforcement of other behavior (DRO), control condition) with his daughter with coaching from the researcher to evaluate comparative effectiveness of interventions using a multicomponent treatment comparison design. Both RIRD and DRO resulted in decreased VS and other challenging behavior when compared to control condition, with DRO resulting in largest decrease. DRO and subsequent reinforcement fading was used to decrease VS and systematically increase DRO intervals. Implications and directions for future research are presented.